Critical Care and Shock

The accuracy of diaphragm thickening fraction, C-reactive protein, cumulative fluid balance, and rapid shallow breathing index in predicting the ease of weaning from mechanical ventilation in critical patients in the ICU

Abstract

Background: Weaning from mechanical ventilation is essential for critically ill patients and obtaining mechanical ventilation. Several parameters were used to assess the patient’s ability to predict the success of weaning.

Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy of diaphragm thickening fraction, C-reactive protein, cumulative fluid balance, and rapid shallow breathing index in predicting the ease of weaning mechanical ventilation in critical patients in the intensive care unit (ICU).

Method: This was a prospective cohort study in which the subjects were adult patients who were treated using mechanical ventilation. Diaphragm thickening fraction, C-reactive protein, cumulative fluid balance, and rapid shallow breathing index were examined during the first 24 hours in the ICU and during mechanical ventilation in pressure support (PS)<8 or T-piece mode until a maximum of the seventh day of the treatment in the ICU or on the seventh day if have not been successfully weaned.

Result: We found that there was no statistical significance between the diaphragm thickening fraction and the ease of weaning from mechanical ventilation (p=0.071). The effect of C-reactive protein on the ease of weaning on mechanical ventilation was not statistically significant (p=0.724). The cumulative balance and rapid shallow breathing index values were also not statistically significant to predict the ease of mechanical ventilation weaning (p=0.510 and p=0.116)

Conclusion: Diaphragm thickening fraction, C-reactive protein, cumulative fluid balance, and rapid shallow breathing index statistically cannot predict the ease of weaning mechanical ventilation in critical patients in the ICU.